Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls | Low Fructose, FODMAP Friendly

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I’m just gonna dive right into this post and say that if you love peanut butter and the magical marriage of kinda sweet, kinda salty, then you absolutely must try this recipe. This is my take on Ace’s Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls, which I’d been spending far too much money on at the F.O.G store in Richmond (not because they’re stupidly expensive, but because I’d buy several of them several times weekly) before I decided to make my own version.

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I’m racking my brain for something creative to write here, but with two group assignments (kill me) looming and three weeks worth of lectures to catch up on, I think my mental efforts best be redirected. So all I’ll say is that these balls are a cheap, no bake, vegan, one bowl, ready-in-moments and virtually mess free job (unless you’re a total klutz like me and trip over absolutely nothing, spilling a kilo of coconut flour on the floor).
Oh and I’ll make and hand deliver a quadruple batch (and throw a few bear hugs and kisses in) for whoever offers to write one of my assignments for me, preferably the “evaluation of statistical analysis on taste receptor gene studies” one (like I said, kill me).

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Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls | Fructose Friendly, Low FODMAP

Makes approx. 10 balls

FODMAP friendly serving size: 1 ball

Ingredients 

  • 1 cup (235g) natural unsalted crunchy peanut butter
  • 5 tbs (38g) chia seeds
  • 4tbs pure maple syrup or coconut nectar
  • 3 tbs activated buckinis
  • Generous pinch fine sea salt
  • For rolling: ground cinnamon, fine sea salt and coconut sugar

Method

  1. Place chia seeds into a coffee grinder or blender and pulse until a flour-like consistency forms
  2. Combine the chia four, PB, maple, buckinis and salt in a bowl with a wooden spoon, then mix with your hands if needed, ensuring all the ingredients are incorporated evenly. Keep stirring until the chia flour has absorbed most of the moisture and a dough-like consistency forms.
  3. In a small bowl, combine 1 tbs coconut sugar, 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon, and a pinch of salt
  4. Divide dough into 10 even portions, then roll into balls with your palms. Lightly roll each ball in cinnamon sugar mixture to coat, then place on a lined tray and allow to set in the freezer for one hour. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for softer balls, or in the freezer for firmer balls. I prefer them firm (trying really hard not to giggle here, real mature I know).

Info for the irritable

  • Peanut butter is high in fructans when consumed in large amounts in one sitting (75g or more). According to Monash, 2 tbs or 32g of PB is considered low in fructans and should thus be tolerated by people with IBS or fructose malabsorption. One of these balls contains 23.5g of PB.

Ax

Photo: Choc Cookie Peanut Butter Fudge Cups

Raw Chocolate Cookie and Peanut Butter Fudge Cups | Vegan, Gluten-Free, FODMAP Friendly

Photo: Choc Cookie Peanut Butter Fudge Cups

The ironic thing about my long-time obsession with the combination of chocolate and peanut butter is that I only became aware of Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups’ existence circa 2012 when health bloggers worldwide went berserk over healthy spin-off recipes and they very quickly filled our Insta feeds. Talk about living under a rock for 21 years. 2012 was definitely the year of the Veganised Chocolate Bar, with healthy versions of our childhood favourites popping up everywhere, from Bounty Bars, Snickers Bars and Twix Bars (check out my FODMAP friendly and gluten free Twix Bar Slice recipe here!), to Mint Slice, Cherry Ripe and Nutella. It was a trend in whole food cooking that was welcomed by all – super simple, no-bake, healthy, and most importantly, reminiscent of everything we loved about chocolate before we were told it was bad for us.

Photo: Choc Cookie Peanut Butter Fudge Cups

So here’s another healthified take on Reese’s ingenious creation to add to the 50,000 others. But you should try mine because I’ve added a chocolatey biscuity base layer. And also because, by virtue of being on my website, it doesn’t call for dates unlike all the other wonderful but not so FODMAP friendly recipe blogs do.

These babies are perfect with a mid morning cuppa, after a workout, on the run, or as a rich guilt-free treat whenever those sweet cravings strike. I personally prefer these cups when they’ve been out of the fridge for a while and the peanut butter fudge has started to melt slightly, like in the photos – it just makes them all the more decadent.

Because this recipe calls for three different amounts of coconut oil and I’m terribly impatient, I like to measure them out separately at the start and have them ready to melt for each layer. If you plan to work quickly and not leave the cups in the freezer too long between layers, you can even melt all the coconut oil together in a saucepan and then separate the relative amounts, melting down again as necessary if the oil begins to solidify between layers.

Photo: Choc Cookie Peanut Butter Fudge Cups

Raw Chocolate Cookie and Peanut Butter Fudge Cups | Vegan, Paleo, Gluten-Free, FODMAP friendly, Low Fructose

Makes 10-12 cups

FODMAP friendly serving size: 1 cup

Ingredients

Raw Chocolate Cookie Base

  • ¾ cup (120g) buckwheat grouts
  • ¼ cup (27g) flax meal (or 27g whole linseeds)
  • ¼ cup (43g) chia seeds
  • ⅓ cup (25g) cacao powder
  • ⅓ cup (60g) melted coconut oil
  • ¼ cup (80g) pure maple syrup

Peanut Butter Fudge Filling

  • ¾ cup (175g) 100% natural peanut butter (no added sugar or salt)
  • 3 tbs (30g) melted coconut oil
  • 4 tbs pure maple syrup
  • Generous pinch fine sea salt

Chocolate Topping

  • ⅓ cup (60g) melted coconut oil
  • 4 tbs cacao powder

Method

  1. Line a 12-hole muffin tray with silicone cupcake moulds.
  2. In a high speed blender or processor, process the buckwheat grouts, chia seeds and flax meal until a crumbly mixture forms. I like to have some crunchy buckwheat bits in there, so I stop processing just before it turns into a fine flour. Add the cacao powder, melted coconut oil and maple, and process on low until it all comes together. Spoon the mixture evenly into the silicone cups and press in firmly with your fingertips. There should be enough to fill 10-12 cups one third of the way. Freeze for 10 mins.
  3. In the meantime, combine all Peanut Butter Fudge Filling ingredients in a bowl. Remove cups from the freezer and spoon the peanut butter filling on top of the bases, smoothing with the back of the spoon. Freeze for 20 mins, ensuring a completely flat position.
  4. Combine Chocolate Topping ingredients. Remove cups from freezer and cover evenly with the chocolate mixture. Carefully return to the freezer for 15 mins, again ensuring a completely flat position. Once completely set, transfer to an airtight container and store in the fridge for up to one week. Sprinkle with crushed roasted peanuts before serving.

Info for the irritable

  • Flaxseed meal (ground linseeds) is high in GOS, or Fermentable Galacto-Oligosaccharides (AKA the “O” in “FODMAP”) when consumed in amounts larger than 30g in one sitting. However, according to Monash University, 1 tbs or 15g of flax meal is considered low in GOS, and should be tolerated by people with IBS or fructose malabsorption. One serving of this recipe (one cup) contains a very low amount of flax – less than 3g!
  • Chia seeds are high in Fructans (AKA the “F” in FODMAP) when consumed in amounts larger than 48g in one sitting. According to Monash, 2 tbs or 24g of chia is considered low in fructans, and should be tolerated by people with IBS or fructose malabsorption. One of these cups contains only 4g of chia.
  • Like chia, peanut butter is also high in fructans when consumed in large amounts in one sitting (75g or more). According to Monash, 2 tbs or 32g of PB is considered low in fructans, and should be tolerated by people with IBS or fructose malabsorption. Each serving of this recipe contains just 17.5g of PB.

Ax

Photo: Choc Cookie Peanut Butter Fudge Cups