Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls | Low Fructose, FODMAP Friendly

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I’m just gonna dive right into this post and say that if you love peanut butter and the magical marriage of kinda sweet, kinda salty, then you absolutely must try this recipe. This is my take on Ace’s Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls, which I’d been spending far too much money on at the F.O.G store in Richmond (not because they’re stupidly expensive, but because I’d buy several of them several times weekly) before I decided to make my own version.

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I’m racking my brain for something creative to write here, but with two group assignments (kill me) looming and three weeks worth of lectures to catch up on, I think my mental efforts best be redirected. So all I’ll say is that these balls are a cheap, no bake, vegan, one bowl, ready-in-moments and virtually mess free job (unless you’re a total klutz like me and trip over absolutely nothing, spilling a kilo of coconut flour on the floor).
Oh and I’ll make and hand deliver a quadruple batch (and throw a few bear hugs and kisses in) for whoever offers to write one of my assignments for me, preferably the “evaluation of statistical analysis on taste receptor gene studies” one (like I said, kill me).

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Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls | Fructose Friendly, Low FODMAP

Makes approx. 10 balls

FODMAP friendly serving size: 1 ball

Ingredients 

  • 1 cup (235g) natural unsalted crunchy peanut butter
  • 5 tbs (38g) chia seeds
  • 4tbs pure maple syrup or coconut nectar
  • 3 tbs activated buckinis
  • Generous pinch fine sea salt
  • For rolling: ground cinnamon, fine sea salt and coconut sugar

Method

  1. Place chia seeds into a coffee grinder or blender and pulse until a flour-like consistency forms
  2. Combine the chia four, PB, maple, buckinis and salt in a bowl with a wooden spoon, then mix with your hands if needed, ensuring all the ingredients are incorporated evenly. Keep stirring until the chia flour has absorbed most of the moisture and a dough-like consistency forms.
  3. In a small bowl, combine 1 tbs coconut sugar, 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon, and a pinch of salt
  4. Divide dough into 10 even portions, then roll into balls with your palms. Lightly roll each ball in cinnamon sugar mixture to coat, then place on a lined tray and allow to set in the freezer for one hour. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for softer balls, or in the freezer for firmer balls. I prefer them firm (trying really hard not to giggle here, real mature I know).

Info for the irritable

  • Peanut butter is high in fructans when consumed in large amounts in one sitting (75g or more). According to Monash, 2 tbs or 32g of PB is considered low in fructans and should thus be tolerated by people with IBS or fructose malabsorption. One of these balls contains 23.5g of PB.

Ax

IQS-Inspired Macadamia ANZAC Biccies

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Growing up, Anzac biccies made by my Great-Aunty Joyce were my absolute fave.

I’d take three of those gems at a time and submerge them in a huge glass of milk (just long enough for the two to get acquainted, but not quite long enough for the biccie to go soggy), then suck the milk out of them before allowing the buttery, golden syrupy goodness to melt in my mouth.

Sweet sentimentality…

I adapted this recipe from the lovely Sarah Wilkinson’s I Quit Sugar (IQS) website. These Anzac biccies are totally fructose free (yay!), calling for rice malt syrup instead of golden syrup or sugar, and they even taste like they’ve got golden syrup in them! Sarah’s recipe uses plain gluten free flour, but since gluten-free flour is quite refined, I replaced it with wholemeal spelt. I had to keep some Anzac tradition, so I’ve used butter in all its full-fat, dairy glory. I did consider trying a mix of coconut oil and macadamia oil instead, because I try to consume butter in small amounts, but I can’t see how a true Anzac biscuit could achieve that golden hue and distinct buttery flavour without, well, butter. You’re welcome to replace the butter with said oils, but I doubt you’d get that traditional ‘Anzac’ quality. Just to boost their yum-factor, these Anzacs have been jazzed up with macadamias. I also chopped up one of the many Loving Earth Luvju chocolates that I had left over from Easter last weekend*, and pressed chunks of it into half of the biscuits before I baked them (I used the Coconut Mylk flavour, which is sweetened with coconut nectar and thus contains a little fructose). Of course, the chocolate is optional, but isn’t it always? Chocolate or no chocolate, hmmm…

GIMME DAT CHOCOLATE!

These Anzacs aren’t quite as lip-smacking as Aunty Joyce’s, but they’re pretty darn good.

*By “leftover from Easter last weekend”, I’m not implying that I have lots of chocolate left over because I didn’t eat that much of it over Easter, although I wish this were the case. Rather, I mean that I totally overdosed on Haigh’s eggs, Kinder Surprises, Marvellous Creations, my Aunty Kate’s pav, the rocky road brownie slice I made “just for my family” (not me, of course!) and every other processed-crap-filled-thing I could get my hands on. So, the Loving Earth Luvjus are left over because last Sunday I told myself that ‘naughty’ chocolate was for Easter, and healthy chocolate was for later. Logic? There is none. Blame it on my chocolate-baby brain.

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IQS-Inspired Macadamia ANZAC Biccies

Dietary Info: Contains gluten (oats & spelt), dairy (butter) and nuts (macadamias). Fructose friendly/free (fructose free unless you use chocolate), low FODMAP (contains some FODMAPs: dried coconut & spelt flour), refined-sugar free. Ingredients

  • 125g unsalted butter (organic if possible)
  • 1/2 cup rice malt syrup (I use Pureharvest brand)
  • pinch Himalayan sea salt
  • 1.5 tsp bicarb-soda
  • 2 tbs boiling water
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 3/4 cups unsweetened desiccated coconut
  • 1 cup wholemeal spelt flour
  • 2/3 cup macadamias, roughly chopped
  • Optional: raw chocolate chopped into small chunks, such as Loving Earth Coconut Mylk Luvju

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 150’C and line 2 large trays with baking paper.
  2. Melt the butter and rice malt syrup in a saucepan over medium-low heat, stirring until it begins to bubble. Remove from heat and add a pinch of salt. If you’re like me and froth over butter-sugar combos (like creamed butter and brown sugar while making a cake, oh my!), then this is the time to dip your pinky in and taste it. Don’t do what I did and wait until you’ve added the baking soda in the next step – it’s foul.
  3. Combine the bicarb-soda with the boiling water and add to the butter mixture.
  4. In another bowl, combine the oats, spelt flour, coconut and macadamias. Pour in the butter mixture and combine well.
  5. Take heaped teaspoons of the dough, roll into balls and place on the lined trays. Flatten slightly into a disk. Repeat until you have distributed amongst the 2 trays, leaving space in between each for spreading (and believe me, they spread!) The dough should make about 20 biscuits, unless you eat a gigantic handful of the raw dough like I did, in which case you’ll only end up with about 12. Oops.
  6. If using chocolate, press chunks into however many biscuits you wish.
  7. Place trays in the oven and bake for about  15-20 minutes, or until golden. The top tray might be ready a few minutes before the bottom – if this happens, remove the top tray and move the bottom tray into its spot.
  8. Like all good cookies, the biscuits will be very soft until they cool down. They should be slightly crunchy on the very outside and chewy in the middle. Allow to sit on trays for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.
  9. Now grab yourself a glass of nut milk, and dunk away.

Lest We Forget, Ax

Coconut, Banana & Raspberry Loaf | Gluten free, Grain Free, Dairy Free

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This Coconut, Banana and Raspberry loaf was one of the first recipes I ever posted, and it was one of those extremely rare first-time baking successes (AKA an absolute fluke). Three years on, this page is still one of the most visited –and emailed about– on my blog, which leads me to believe it’s one of the most used recipes, which is all really alarming because this morning it occurred to me that I haven’t updated this page in three years. As gravely expected, the photography was terrible (I’m talking iPhone-4-and-heavily-light-streak-filtered terrible). So today I (very quickly) re-photographed it.

FYI, it still tastes great. Thank God I had taste judgement and some sort of cooking knack going for me in 2013, if nothing else.

Packed with nourishing fats, complete proteins, an array of vitamins and minerals, fibre and antioxidants, this recipe makes for a great snack at any time of day. Eat it on its own or toasted and lightly buttered, or try it my favourite way: warm with a few dollops of organic natural yoghurt, fresh berries, a few sprigs of mint and a cup of French earl grey on the side.

Coconut, Banana & Raspberry Loaf | Gluten Free, Grain Free, Dairy Free)

Makes 10 thick slices, or 15 thin

FODMAP friendly serving size: One THIN slice (see notes below)

Ingredients

  • 200g dried coconut (desiccated, shredded or chips)
  • 6 large (60g each) free range eggs
  • 1 large overripe banana, mashed
  • 1 tsp (3g) gluten and aluminium free baking powder
  • ¼ cup + 1 tbs (approx 100g) pure maple syrup
  • 1 heaped tsp (5g) pure vanilla extract or paste
  • ¼ cup (287g) frozen raspberries 

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180*C and line a 26cm loaf tin with baking paper.
  2. In a high-speed food processor, process the dried coconut until it forms a crumbly flour-like consistency. Do not over-process it, as it will begin to turn into butter. Add the baking powder and mix on low speed for a few seconds to combine.
  3. In an electric mixer, beat the eggs, maple syrup and vanilla on medium speed for a few minutes. Add the mashed banana and mix on low for a few seconds to combine.
  4. Fold the processed coconut into the wet mixture, then gently fold through the frozen raspberries.
  5. Pour the batter into the lined loaf tin. Top the batter with extra raspberries and coconut chips. If I have some on hand, I also like to top the loaf with a few heaped teaspoons of old fashioned all natural raspberry jam, and lightly swirl it through the top of the batter with the edge of the spoon, for extra deliciousness.
  6. Bake at 180*C for 30 mins – at this point it should have risen significantly and started to deepen in colour. Turn the temperature down to 150*C and bake for a further 20-25 mins or until a skewer comes out clean. It takes around 55 minutes in total in my oven. Cooking times may vary depending on your oven and loaf tin. Remove from the oven and allow to stand in tin for 10 mins before removing from tin and placing on a wire rack to cool completely. You can eat it immediately, although it will be difficult to cut until it’s cooled. It’s best served at room temperature or toasted. Store in an airtight container away from direct sunlight for up to 3 days, or slice it up and freeze for up to one month.

Info for the irritable

Although dried coconut is low in fructose, it’s high in polyols (sorbitol) when consumed amounts equal to or greater than 37g. Once divided into at least 10 slices, the loaf contains 20g dried coconut per serving. This amount is considered to be low in FODMAPs, however it still might be problematic for those with fructose malabsorption or IBS who have high sensitivity to polyols. If you’re unsure of the severity of your polyol malabsorption, try a very thin slice of this loaf in one sitting, making sure that you limit your FODMAP load before and after. Monitor how you feel over the next 24 hours. If you don’t notice any symptoms, try a thicker slice the next day, ensuring that you’re mindful of your overall FODMAP load.

Other notes

  • To mix things up, you can use frozen mixed berries or frozen blueberries instead of the raspberries
  • If you’re making this recipe for a special occasion and want it to be more decadent, try adding white or dark chocolate chips

Ax

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