5 Ingredient Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls

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I’m just gonna dive right in and say that if you love peanut butter and/or magical marriages of sweet and salty, then you absolutely must try this recipe because it is, quite frankly, simplicity at its culinary best. But before you think I’m tooting my own horn, please note that I am not taking full credit for this creation – this recipe is a replication of Ace’s Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls, which I’d been spending far too much money on at the F.O.G store in Richmond before I decided to try to make them myself.

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I’m racking my brain for something creative to write here, but with two group assignments (kill me) looming and three weeks worth of lectures to catch up on, I think my mental efforts best be redirected. So all I’ll say is that these balls are a cheap, no bake, vegan, one bowl, ready-in-moments and virtually mess free (unless you’re a klutz like me and trip over absolutely nothing and spill 1kg of coconut flour on the floor) kind of job, plus they’re super yummy and satisfying, and you should really try them.
Oh and I’ll make and hand deliver a quadruple batch (and throw a few bear hugs and kisses in) for whoever offers to write one of my assignments for me, preferably the evaluation of statistical analysis on taste receptor gene studies (like I said, kill me).

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Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Balls

Ingredients (makes approx. 9 balls)

  • 1 cup natural peanut butter
  • 4tbs coconut nectar/syrup
  • 4 tbs coconut flour
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt
  • 3 tbs activated buckinis

Method

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl with a wooden spoon, then mix with your hands, ensuring all the ingredients are incorporated evenly. Massage until the “dough” comes together.
  2. Divide into 9 even portions, then roll into smooth balls. I rolled mine in a mixture of ground cinnamon, coconut sugar and a pinch of salt which added to the yumminess and finished them off really nicely, but this is totally optional. Place on a tray and refrigerate for an hour, or until set. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.imageimage
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Gettin’ my Twix Fix: “Twix” Cookie Bar Slice

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There’s only one confectionery I love more than Kinder Surprises (I still receive a giant Kinder Surprise egg every Easter from the Easter Bunny AKA mum), and that’s Twix bars. There’s something about the shortbread biscuit base, gooey caramel filling and creamy chocolate blanket combo that makes my heart sing.
Fortunately (or unfortunately, however you choose to look at it), I’ve been able to reduce my once several-weekly Twix consumption to a moderated treat here and there, but that doesn’t mean I stop wanting my Twix Fix several times a week.

In the past, I’ve always shied away from creating healthified sweets that called for ‘caramel’, simply because in the ever-ominous healthy dessert world, ‘caramel’ is synonymous with a heck load of dates (and therefore excess fructose). To my delight, I recently discovered how caramel-y the combination of almond butter, pure maple syrup and coconut oil is, thanks to the lovely Ashley from Blissful Basil, whose Twix bar recipe was the inspiration behind this one. I have tweaked the recipe to suit my tastes and to reduce the relative maple syrup content and FODMAP load.

You will notice that this recipe does seem a little energy dense  – there’s a lot of coconut oil, almond butter and maple. But this is one of those recipes that should be treated as a treat, and that means portion control. Good news is that because it’s so decadent and rich, you only need a little piece, and therefore the recipe yields lots of serves. However stopping at one piece is difficult.

Note for those with FrucMal/IBS: although this recipe contains no excess fructose, it does contain a few FODMAPs (coconut flour and almond butter). I’ve eaten several bars in a row to test my tolerance (at least I told myself that was the purpose of the binge) and I didn’t have any upsets, but depending on your own sensitivity to these ingredients, you may need to be more careful.

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Vegan “Twix” Cookie Bars

Ingredients 

Biscuit base:

  • 2 + 1/4 cups rolled (not instant) oats, processed in a high-powered processor until a fine flour is formed
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup melted coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup + 1 tbs pure maple syrup
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract

Caramel filling:

  • 1 cup almond butter
  • 1/3 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil
  • 1/3 tsp fine sea salt

Chocolate topping:

  • 1/2 cup coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup raw cacao (more or less depending on how dark/bitter you like it)
  • 1-2 tbs pure maple syrup
  • Pinch fine sea salt

Method 

  1. Preheat the oven to 180*C and line a tart/slice pan (approx 20cm x 30cm) with baking paper.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the oat flour, coconut flour, coconut oil, maple syrup and vanilla. Press the mixture firmly and evenly into the bottom of the prepared pan. Use a fork to poke 10 holes in the base. Bake for 18 minutes or until the colour is becoming golden. Do not wait for it to brown, as it will be overcooked and dry. Remove from the oven. It should still be a little soft and will harden as it cools. Allow to cool completely in the pan.
  3. To make the caramel filling, place the almond butter, maple, coconut oil and salt in a saucepan and lightly whisk over medium heat until all ingredients are melted and combined. Remove from the heat and allow to cool to room temp.
  4. Pour the caramel filling over the cooled biscuit base and freeze for 30 minutes to set the caramel.
  5. To make the chocolate layer, place the coconut oil, cacao and maple in a saucepan and stir over low heat until the ingredients have completely melted together. Pour the chocolate over the caramel layer, smoothing with the back of a spoon. Return the slice to the freezer for another 20 minutes to set the chocolate layer.
  6. Remove the slice from the tray/pan. Transfer to a chopping board and allow to sit for 5-10 minutes before cutting into squares or bars. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one week. It probably freezes quite well, although I’ve never needed to try it because it gets demolished so quickly in my household. If you do happen to freeze it, please let me know how it goes!

Happy Nourishing! 
Ax

 

Lemon & Raspberry Oat Balls

It would be ill-mannered of me to start this post without first apologising for my serious illustration of MIA over the past few months. It’s a crappy excuse I know, but life’s demands have been getting the better of me. Life before full time Uni, work commitments and several ongoing projects allowed for much more time in the kitchen, but I’ve been feeling very guilty lately so I’m going to make a huuuuuge effort to post more regularly from now on!

What better way to butter you up than with a pretty little sweet treat?
My website is definitely calling out for more quick and tasty on-the-go snack recipes, so I thought I’d go down the ‘bliss balls’ road, only these ones don’t contain dates and are almost fructose free. The coconut and almond give these balls a velvety creaminess, which is lovely with the tartness of the lemon and raspberry. They’re perfect to munch on in between meals, with a cuppa, or when those after-dinner sweet cravings strike!

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Lemon & Raspberry Oat Balls

Ingredients
Makes approx. 10 balls

  • 1 cup oat flour (made from approx. 100g rolled oats – see method)
  • 1/2 cup almond meal/flour
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened desiccated coconut plus extra, to roll.
  • 1/8 cup melted coconut oil
  • 1 cup thawed frozen raspberries
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 tbs rice malt syrup
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Method

  1. In a high-power processor, process the rolled oats until a fine flour forms. Around 100g oats should yield 1 cup of oat flour.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and pulse until the mixture is smooth and well combined. It should be very soft (they set quite hard in the fridge), but not dry or wet. Add more oat flour/coconut oil if necessary.
  3. Roll into balls using your hands, then roll in desiccated coconut, cacao or crushed macadamias. I rolled some of mine in crushed goji berries and bee pollen, but the plain coconut ones are my fave! Allow to set in the fridge for at least an hour before eating.
  4. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.

Happy Nourishing!
Ax

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Jolly Christmas Cheer and the Ultimate Summer Salad: Maple-roasted Pumpkin & Chicken Salad with Strawberries & Caramelised Macadamias

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Synonymous with all things indulgent, the Silly Season is a time for feeding the soul…

We find ourselves kicking back more, getting outdoors more and filling our social calendars with BBQs, parties and beachside gatherings. Any excuse to get together with friends and family over beautiful food and one too many drinks will do.
So yes, between all the Christmas, New Year and summertime (for us Aussies) festivities, it’s almost impossible to stay as disciplined with your diet as you normally would. It feels like you’re perpetually surrounded by a sea of lip-smacking food, and it somehow seems more justified to pick at anything and everything just because “it’s the festive season!”.

The most important thing is to not be too hard on yourself.
I choose to look at it this way: if you can’t loosen up and treat yourself at this time of year, then when the hell can you?! That pretty pavlova wasn’t just put there to take photos of. You are supposed to enjoy this time of year and everything it has to offer. With that said, while I might loosen my belt (literally) and pick at more desserts, cheese boards and processed snacks than I usually would, this doesn’t mean that all my other healthful habits go down the drain. I certainly don’t want to miss out on yummy food, but I also know that going totally overboard will leave me with nothing but a heavy guilty conscience and five extra kilos. As with any time of year, maintaining balance is important. Some things I do to achieve this balance include staying hydrated at all times, opting for vodka, lime and soda over sugar alcoholic drinks, filling up on veggies and quality protein at meals so that I don’t have a bottomless pit when it comes to dessert, chewing my food slowly so I enjoy each mouthful, drinking green smoothies each day to leave less room for unhealthy and processed snacks, taking long walks and swimming whenever I can. I try to be as mindful as possible, while enjoying myself all the while.

It’s easy(ish) to stay in control of what goes into your mouth when you’re at home, but not so much when your plate is at the hands of someone else – you naturally feel pressured to eat everything that’s being served up to you, and unless your family and friends are squeaky clean raw vegans (which mine certainly are not), chances are you’re going to be faced with an array of not-so-healthy temptations. To combat this, I make a big, bright salad like this one whenever I’m asked to bring a plate of food to a gathering, so there’s always something delicious and healthy for me to fill up on and I won’t be as likely devour my weight’s worth of double brie, cabana and cheesecake.

This Maple-roasted Pumpkin and Chicken Salad with Strawberries and Macadamias is fab – I can’t wait to share it with you. But first, here are some snaps from Chrissy Day, all taken on my iPhone because although Santa very generously gave me a Canon EOS 700D SLR so I can start doing real food photography, I’m not quite ready to move from the comfort zone of my iPhone 5 just yet.

As I’m sure you can imagine, I had a ball preparing festive treats all day (and night) long on Christmas Eve…

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I first made this salad around two months ago, and it’s already become my go-to staple of the season. It’s simple and has enough substance to serve to your family any day of the week, but it’s also a little fancy, making it the perfect dish for entertaining. Casual indulgence, if you like. Donning just the right amounts of sweet, sour and savoury, this salad will have your taste buds singing and your belly satisfied. Like any salad, this recipe is very forgiving, so feel free to play around with it. If you’re after a vegetarian dish or light side salad, simply leave the chicken out. This salad is wonderful when the roasted veggies and chicken are warm, however, it’s just as delicious cold, so don’t worry about being meticulous with timing everything. Leftovers make for a perfect lunch the next day!

Full bellies and happy hearts all round…

Maple-roasted Pumpkin, Sweet Potato & Chicken Salad with Strawberries & Caramelised Macadamias

Serves 4-5

Ingredients

  • 1/2 roast chicken, skin removed & flesh shredded (omit for vegetarian)
  • 1/4 Jap/Kent pumpkin, peeled and cut into 3cm chunks
  • 1 large sweet potato (approx. 700g), washed, peeled and cut into 3cm chunks
  • 1/2 cup macadamias, chopped roughly into halves
  • 2 tbs + 2 tsp pure maple syrup
  • 1.5 tbs oil (olive, coconut or macadamia)
  • 200g baby leaf salad mix
  • 100g cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 punnet (approx. 200g) strawberries, sliced
  • 1/2 cup spring onion, chopped (green part only)
  • 1 tsp dried oregano leaves
  • 1 tbs pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
  • Small handful each fresh basil and parsley (flat-leaf), roughly chopped
  • 100g goat’s curd or Danish feta, to serve (omit for dairy free)
  • EVOO, to serve
  • Balsamic vinegar, to serve (optional)
  • Himalayan sea salt, to taste

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 170*C and line a tray with baking paper. In a small bowl, coat the macadamias with 2 tsp maple syrup. Pour onto the baking paper and place in the oven for 10 minutes or until golden and caramelised. Remove and set aside to cool completely. Store in an airtight container until ready to use.
  2. Turn the oven up to 200*C and line a tray with baking paper. In a large bowl, coat the pumpkin and sweet potato chunks with 2 tbs maple syrup, 1.5 tbs olive oil, oregano and salt. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes, turning half way through. For the last 5 minutes of baking, add the pepitas to the tray. As always, cooking times will vary from oven to oven and depending on the size you’ve cut your veg. Use my photos as a reference to determine if the veggies are ‘done’ or not. This salad works best when the veggies are a little on the ‘under’ side – quite soft in the middle and caramelised and chewy around the edges. Don’t let them crisp up too much as the caremelisation will dry out!
  3. While the veggies are roasting, arrange the salad leaves in a servings bowl or platter. Drizzle leaves with a little olive oil and a small amount of balsamic vinegar, if using (the balsamic goes perfectly with the strawberries and feta, but be sure to only use a tiny bit otherwise the salad will be too sweet!).
  4. When the veggies are ready, top the salad mix with the spring onion, fresh herbs, cherry tomatoes, strawberries, roasted veg, chicken, feta, macadamias and pepitas. Just before servings, finish with a tiny sprinkle of EVOO. Enjoy!

Happy Nourishing!
Ax

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IQS-Inspired Macadamia ANZAC Biccies

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Growing up, Anzac biccies made by my Great-Aunty Joyce were my absolute fave.

I’d take three of those gems at a time and submerge them in a huge glass of milk (just long enough for the two to get acquainted, but not quite long enough for the biccie to go soggy), then suck the milk out of them before allowing the buttery, golden syrupy goodness to melt in my mouth.

Sweet sentimentality…

I adapted this recipe from the lovely Sarah Wilkinson’s I Quit Sugar (IQS) website. These Anzac biccies are totally fructose free (yay!), calling for rice malt syrup instead of golden syrup or sugar, and they even taste like they’ve got golden syrup in them! Sarah’s recipe uses plain gluten free flour, but since gluten-free flour is quite refined, I replaced it with wholemeal spelt. I had to keep some Anzac tradition, so I’ve used butter in all its full-fat, dairy glory. I did consider trying a mix of coconut oil and macadamia oil instead, because I try to consume butter in small amounts, but I can’t see how a true Anzac biscuit could achieve that golden hue and distinct buttery flavour without, well, butter. You’re welcome to replace the butter with said oils, but I doubt you’d get that traditional ‘Anzac’ quality. Just to boost their yum-factor, these Anzacs have been jazzed up with macadamias. I also chopped up one of the many Loving Earth Luvju chocolates that I had left over from Easter last weekend*, and pressed chunks of it into half of the biscuits before I baked them (I used the Coconut Mylk flavour, which is sweetened with coconut nectar and thus contains a little fructose). Of course, the chocolate is optional, but isn’t it always? Chocolate or no chocolate, hmmm…

GIMME DAT CHOCOLATE!

These Anzacs aren’t quite as lip-smacking as Aunty Joyce’s, but they’re pretty darn good.

*By “leftover from Easter last weekend”, I’m not implying that I have lots of chocolate left over because I didn’t eat that much of it over Easter, although I wish this were the case. Rather, I mean that I totally overdosed on Haigh’s eggs, Kinder Surprises, Marvellous Creations, my Aunty Kate’s pav, the rocky road brownie slice I made “just for my family” (not me, of course!) and every other processed-crap-filled-thing I could get my hands on. So, the Loving Earth Luvjus are left over because last Sunday I told myself that ‘naughty’ chocolate was for Easter, and healthy chocolate was for later. Logic? There is none. Blame it on my chocolate-baby brain.

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IQS-Inspired Macadamia ANZAC Biccies

Dietary Info: Contains gluten (oats & spelt), dairy (butter) and nuts (macadamias). Fructose friendly/free (fructose free unless you use chocolate), low FODMAP (contains some FODMAPs: dried coconut & spelt flour), refined-sugar free. Ingredients

  • 125g unsalted butter (organic if possible)
  • 1/2 cup rice malt syrup (I use Pureharvest brand)
  • pinch Himalayan sea salt
  • 1.5 tsp bicarb-soda
  • 2 tbs boiling water
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 3/4 cups unsweetened desiccated coconut
  • 1 cup wholemeal spelt flour
  • 2/3 cup macadamias, roughly chopped
  • Optional: raw chocolate chopped into small chunks, such as Loving Earth Coconut Mylk Luvju

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 150’C and line 2 large trays with baking paper.
  2. Melt the butter and rice malt syrup in a saucepan over medium-low heat, stirring until it begins to bubble. Remove from heat and add a pinch of salt. If you’re like me and froth over butter-sugar combos (like creamed butter and brown sugar while making a cake, oh my!), then this is the time to dip your pinky in and taste it. Don’t do what I did and wait until you’ve added the baking soda in the next step – it’s foul.
  3. Combine the bicarb-soda with the boiling water and add to the butter mixture.
  4. In another bowl, combine the oats, spelt flour, coconut and macadamias. Pour in the butter mixture and combine well.
  5. Take heaped teaspoons of the dough, roll into balls and place on the lined trays. Flatten slightly into a disk. Repeat until you have distributed amongst the 2 trays, leaving space in between each for spreading (and believe me, they spread!) The dough should make about 20 biscuits, unless you eat a gigantic handful of the raw dough like I did, in which case you’ll only end up with about 12. Oops.
  6. If using chocolate, press chunks into however many biscuits you wish.
  7. Place trays in the oven and bake for about  15-20 minutes, or until golden. The top tray might be ready a few minutes before the bottom – if this happens, remove the top tray and move the bottom tray into its spot.
  8. Like all good cookies, the biscuits will be very soft until they cool down. They should be slightly crunchy on the very outside and chewy in the middle. Allow to sit on trays for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.
  9. Now grab yourself a glass of nut milk, and dunk away.

Lest We Forget, Ax

A healthy twist on a calorific classic: Banana Bread

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Banana bread is one of THE dreamiest nostalgic foods…

When that ever-familar aroma of toasted and buttered banana bread fills your kitchen, you know you’re home. When I was younger, I’d often barge through the front door after school, throw 4 thick slices of Brumby’s banana bread in the toaster before I’d even put my bag down, smother them with so much butter that it would pool on top and drip down my chin as I took each bite. I remember finding comfort in the justification that something that tasted as good as cake could be as healthy as bread. Ha!

I may have since come to my senses, but my senses don’t fail me: the second I smell fresh banana bread, or better still, warm and buttered fresh banana bread, my salivary glands quite literally go bananas. I know I’m not alone here.

Instead of the classic recipe’s refined wheat flour, my banana bread calls for spelt flour. Although spelt is technically related to wheat and there’s a lot of debate out there as to which grain is more nutritious, the gluten is spelt is more fragile and susceptible to chemical and mechanical breakdown in the body, making it significantly easier to digest for many people.

Without all the butter, refined sugar and flour, my healthified version might not be Brumby’s worthy, but I promise you that it still manages to celebrate all the things we love about the classic: that buttery melt-in-your-mouth texture, the comforting flavour of ripe banana and just the right amount of sweetness to bring it all together. Yum.

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Brilliantly Healthy Banana Bread

Serves 14

Dietary info: Wheat free, dairy free, refined-sugar free, fructose-friendly, contains some fructans (see notes), gluten (spelt), nuts (almonds) and egg.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups mashed over ripe banana (approx. 4 medium-large bananas)
  • 3 large organic free range eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup macadamia nut oil
  • 1 tbs pure vanilla extract
  • 3 tbs pure maple syrup
  • 1.5 cups wholemeal spelt flour*
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut*
  • 1/2 cup almond meal*
  • 3 tbs chia seeds
  • 1.25  tsp baking powder (aluminium free)
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground cardamom
  • generous pinch Himalayan sea salt
  • To top batter with before baking: 1 large banana cut lengthways, 3 tbs pecans*, 2 tbs good quality dark choc chips (optional)

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 160*C and generously grease a loaf tin (my tin is approx. 11cm x 26cm)
  2. In one bowl, combine the mashed banana, beaten eggs, macadamia oil, vanilla and maple syrup.
  3. In another bowl, combine the spelt flour, coconut, chia seeds, almond meal, spices and salt. Create a well in the middle of the flour mixture and pour banana mixture into it. Gently fold the ingredients until just fully combined. Be very careful not to over mix.
  4. Pour the batter evenly into the prepared loaf tin and smooth out lightly with the back of a large spoon if needed. Top with halved banana, pecans, dark chic chips and a drizzle of maple syrup. Bake for around 45 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean, but still moist (don’t wait until the skewer comes out completely dry because the loaf is supposed to be moist throughout!). Cooking times will vary from oven to oven. If the top begins to brown too much while cooking, cover with a little bit of foil.
  5. Remove from the oven, allow to stand in the tin for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack.
  6. For a snack, serve on its own or toasted with a little organic butter or your favourite nut butter and a little drizzle of maple syrup. For a fuss-free brekky, serve warm with organic yoghurt/coconut yoghurt and berries. For something a little more indulgent, serve toasted with organic butter, some choc chips and a drizzle of maple syrup – a sure winner among the boys!

Notes

  • To those on a low FODMAP diet:
    Ingredients marked with one asterisk (*) contain moderate amounts of FODMAPs. Each individual’s tolerance to these particular foods will vary, but unless you’re super sensitive or in the early stages of healing your gut, said ingredients in isolation shouldn’t cause a reaction if consumed in small amounts. However, because this banana bread contains a combination, it is possible that very sensitive individuals might not be able to tolerate a full serving of the bread (one 1.5cm thick slice).  If you find that you’re generally fine with these foods and you’re used to consuming similar things daily, then you should be fine with this recipe, especially if you limit yourself to one slice per sitting.  I can tolerate two slices now without worry, however two years ago I would have been pushing it and would have stuck to one. ALWAYS test your own tolerance! If spelt is a known issue for you in large amounts, try replacing half of it with buckwheat flour (but please remember that it will give a significantly different texture and flavour).  If you cannot tolerate spelt at all, you can play around with different low FODMAP flour combinations such as buckwheat flour, oat flour, rice flour etc. Other lower FODMAP swaps include ground flaxseed, peanut flour or carob powder instead of almond meal and carob powder instead of chia seeds. All the above will lend different textures and flavours and I have not tested any of them so if you do, I’d love to hear how you went!

It’s my birthday, I’ll eat (an entire) cake if I want to.

IMG_4487So I’ve been MIA lately (sorry about that), but I do have a very viable excuse: 21st Birthday celebrations. I’ve gotta be honest, though: it’s not really my birthday. I actually turned 21 back in July, but with over fifty close friends exploring abroad and a home in the midst of renovations and landscaping at the time, it made perfect sense to hold off celebrating until later in the year when all my pals would be home and my house would be party-ready. Just a quick side note: for anyone who’s planning a milestone birthday party in future, birthdays and parties in close proximity to one another are totally overrated. I highly recommend having your party 4-6 months after your actual birthday – it literally feels like you have two birthdays in the one year!

Anyway, I had the most incredible time laughing, dancing and going bonkers until the wee hours of Sunday with over 200 brilliant people. I almost slipped ‘memorable’ in there with ‘incredible’, but I’d be lying because the entire night is a monumental blur. A monumentally glorious blur, but a blur nonetheless. I do, however,  remember that the night went far too quickly as all eagerly-anticipated celebrations do, and I also remember that the night was absolutely perfect in every way. I’d give almost anything to relive those hours on the dance floor again. On the contrary, Sunday’s whopping hangover is something I’m happy to farewell. It’s Thursday as I write this, and I still haven’t recovered fully. Nor has my digestive system…

Sunday and Monday, I ate birthday cake for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Technically speaking, I didn’t eat it for breakfast, lunch and dinner, but rather with breakfast, lunch and dinner, with numerous candy bar leftovers (hello, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and white chocolate raspberry bullets!) in between. My family couldn’t believe my bizarre lack on self-control as I scoffed my two-tiered moist-white-chocolate-mudcake-with-strawberry-swirl by the handful. I usually turn down one slice of cake — opting for a mouthful of someone else’s instead– let alone eating three kilos of the stuff over two days. The thing is that I wasn’t even trying to control myself. I didn’t want to. If I can’t eat every delicious ounce of refined, fat-forming and fructose-fueled food under the sun during my 21st birthday celebrations, then when the hell will I?! It’s my birthday, I’ll eat whatever, whenever and however much I want to.

Come Monday night, I was feeling thoroughly flat. I hadn’t eaten a full days’ serving of vegetables in three or four days. My daily three litres of water came in the form of vodka and champagne punch. I’d been forgetting to take my vitamin supplements and my excitement I hadn’t had a decent sleep in weeks. AND I’d been shoveling FODMAPs and fructose into my gob like nobody’s business (can you imagine how mortified I was when I receieved the 20 kilos of candy I ordered for my candy bar, only to realise that 90% of it was sweetened with the only thing worse than pure fructose itself: HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP?!?!?!?!?!). I’m almost ashamed to say that this did not stop me. Almost…

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Refined food has an evilly addictive nature, and I’ve got an awfully addictive personality, so it took a lot to quell the devil in my head who was telling me just one more chunk of white mud cake wasn’t going to kill me. My abdominal cramps and impertinent gastrointestinal symptoms suggested otherwise. I told myself enough was enough. I needed serious nutrients, but lacked the motivation to move, let alone cook. So I did a quick brainstorm and whipped up a perfectly healthy and positively delicious Summer dinner in 25 minutes. I cheated a little bit, but my family couldn’t tell, and neither will yours!

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This meal is jam-packed with A-grade quality proteins and complete amino acids, complex carbohydrates, antioxidants, minerals, a range of vitamins and essential fats including the amazing benefits omega-3. I started eating salmon at the start of last year, I haven’t looked back since. My eczema and dermatitis have improved ten-fold since incorporating essential fatty acids into my daily diet. I eat one large salmon fillet once a week, and small amounts of raw and smoked salmon throughout the week.

Crispy-Skinned Salmon with Lemon, Thyme & Mint Quinoa

Serves 5
Ingredients:

  • 5 boneless salmon fillets, skin on (200g each, wild if possible)
  • 2 Packets Celebrate Health Lemon & Thyme Quinoa
  • 2 cups low-sodium chicken/vegetable stock
  • 2/3 cup water
  • Leaves from 2 large rosemary sprigs, chopped
  • 2 large handfuls baby spinach leaves, torn
  • 1 small handful fresh mint leaves
  • 1 tbs fresh thyme leaves (optional)
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • 200g green beans
  • 1/2 cup flaked almonds, lightly roasted
  • Juice and grated rind of 1/2 small lemon
  • EVOO (extra-virgin olive oil)
  • Sea salt flakes

Method: 

  1. Place quinoa, stock and water in a large saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to the boil (uncovered). Reduce heat to low and cover, allowing the grains to absorb the liquid for 15 minutes. Remove from heat when all the liquid is absorbed and the quinoa is fluffy.
  2. In the meantime, place salmon, skin-side up, on a large plate. Drizzle skin with EVOO, sprinkle skin and sides with chopped rosemary leaves and rub a little sea salt flakes into the skin. Heat a non-stick fry-pan over medium-high heat. Place the salmon fillets skin-side down on the pan (if it’s hot enough, it should sizzle and spit, but not burn). Cook for around 4 minutes until the skin is crisp. Flip, then cook for a further 4 minutes on the other side. Remove from heat and cover with foil. Move quickly, as the the salmon will continue to cook. Cooking times will always vary depending on the thickness of the fillet, but this will generally ensure a medium-rare centre that flakes away and melts in your mouth. I love my salmon a little pinker in the middle, as pictured. Adjust cooking times to suit how rare or well-done you like yours.
  3. Transfer the quinoa to a mixing bowl and toss through torn mint leaves, thyme leaves, spinach, avocado and a little grated lemon rind. Drizzle with a little EVOO.
  4. Arrange green beans on plates (I served mine raw for textural and nutritional purposes –not because I was just feeling lazy, of course 😉 — but you could lightly sautée them in a tiny bit garlic-infused EVOO if you wish). Top beans with quinoa salad and salmon fillets. Drizzle each plate with a little lemon juice and sprinkle roasted flaked almonds on top. Bog in.

Happy Nourishing!
Ax

Porridge ParTea: Creamy Chai-Infused Oats + Cinnamon-Grilled Banana

Not that I’ve traveled there yet, but I don’t know what I love more about India – the glorious cuisine, or the fact that Masala chai originated from there. I know I go on about how much certain foods do it for me, like bananas and coconut anything, but chai is something that really does it for me. I’d even go so far as to say that it’s almost on par with dark chocolate. I just can’t get past the flavour combination of aromatic cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, star anise, fennel and clove.

Almost three years ago, I was introduced to chai in the form of the all-too popular latte, which is essentially just a combination milk, chai-flavoured syrup/powder (sugar) and honey/sugar. It pains me to admit it, but this whirlwind love affair didn’t start in a trendy cafe one Winter morning as I flicked through Frankie, or even out of a mug. Rather, I fell in love with the contents of a paper takeaway cup at my local McCafe. That’s right.

Before long, my obsession with the creamy, sweetly spiced awesomeness had gone from being a once-weekly ‘treat’, to a daily pre-morning-lecture-ritual. I justified my addiction by telling myself that Lot 6 Cafe used chai powder, not syrup like Macca’s did, and thus couldn’t be as sugary, and I only ordered a size small so how much harm could one measly cup a day possibly do anyway? Deep down I knew that I was consuming the calorific equivalent to a Max Brenner hot chocolate each time I downed that little cup of sunshine, and I knew something had to give. The truth is, I loved the marriage of flavours and the place of bliss each cup took me far too much to give it up entirely, and I wasn’t aware –or particularly willing to look for — healthier, less-glorious alternatives. So I kept downing it.

Then I discovered Masala chai tea. The real stuff. I don’t remember where it was, but it certainly wasn’t at Macca’s, and it was so magnificent that I haven’t been swayed by the temptation of a chai latte since. My particular favourites are all T2 varieties, Tea Drop’s Malabar Chai and Twinings’ Chai-Vanilla Origins. These days, my afternoons are incomplete without a big mug of chai tea and a few pieces of my Dark ‘Chocolate’ Bark to dunk in – it’s my simple, infallible way to slip a little bit of calm into my day.

For me, trying new additions to the chai range at T2 elicits a similar feeling to shoe shopping. No exaggeration. Last Friday during my lunch break at work I had the pleasure of both and it was the best start to the weekend I could ask for. A new pair of Windsor Smiths and a box of T2 Creamy Choc Chai should make any girl happy. 

When 5:30 hit and the weekend’s social calendar should have been on my mind, I was thinking about Saturday’s breakfast. I knew I wanted a big fat mug of my new Creamy Choc Chai, but I wanted to try something a bit different. So, I decided to marry three of the World’s Greatest Things, according to me: oats, chai and grilled banana. Saturday morning was unreal.IMG_2012IMG_2015 IMG_2011 IMG_2010

Creamy Chai-Infused Porridge & Cinnamon-Grilled Banana

Ingredients:

  • 40g oats (1/3 cup + 2 tbs)
  • 1 tsp chia seeds
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup milk of choice
  • 2 tsp loose leaf chai tea in a brewing tool (or 2 tea bags)
  • Ground cinnamon*
  • Ground cardamom*
  • Ground nutmeg*
  • 1 ripe firm banana, quartered (cut once lengthways, then half again)
  • 1 tsp pure organic maple syrup
  • 1 tbs flaked almonds
  • 1 tsp walnuts, chopped
  • Stevia

Method:

  1. Preheat the grill & toast the flaked almonds until golden. Watch them carefully – my grill takes 30 seconds to toast almonds, not 5 minutes, which I learnt last week when I almost set my entire kitchen on fire. Remove almonds from grill and allow to cool.
  2. In a small saucepan bring the milk and water to a simmer over medium heat. Remove from heat, add the tea and allow to infuse for 8 minutes. Return the saucepan to the heat and bring to a simmer again. Remove the tea bags and transfer the mixture to a large mug/jug.
  3. In the meantime, sprinkle the banana pieces with a little cinnamon and grill until they begin to bubble and caramelise. Depending on your grill, this could take anywhere from 3 to 10 minutes.
  4. Add the oats, chia seeds, 1 tsp cinnamon*, 3/4 tsp cardamom* a pinch of nutmeg* and 3/4 of the milky tea mixture to the saucepan. Allow to sit over medium heat.  Once it begins to boil, stir continuously until the oats and seeds have absorbed the liquid, around 5 minutes. Add the remaining milk mixture and extra water/milk if you need it. Remove from heat when a desired consistency is reached. Taste and sweeten with stevia or other sweetener of choice accordingly.
  5. Spoon porridge into a serving bowl and top with the grilled banana, walnuts, toasted almonds and maple syrup. Delec-tea-ble!

* I’m HUGE on spices, and chai spices are no exception. The quantities I’ve suggested give an intense and deeply aromatic chai flavour. If you’re not so big on these spices and like your chai a little more subtle, just add the ground spices at the end, to taste.

Happy Nourishing!
Ax

Coconut, Banana & Raspberry Loaf (Gluten & Grain Free)

imageThis Coconut, Banana and Raspberry loaf was one of the first recipes I ever posted, and it was one of those extremely rare first-time baking successes (AKA an absolute fluke). Three years on, this page is still one of the most visited on my blog, which leads me to believe it’s one of the most used recipes (as do the frequent emails I receive about it), which is all really alarming because this morning it occurred to me that I haven’t updated this page in three years. As gravely expected, the photography was terrible (I’m talking iPhone 4 terrible), the writing was cringe worthy, and I couldn’t even remember what the loaf tasted like. So today I made it and (very quickly) re-photographed it.

FYI, it still tastes great. Thank God I had taste judgement and some sort of cooking knack going for me in 2013, if nothing else.

Packed with nourishing fats, complete protein, an array of vitamins and minerals, fibre and antioxidants, this recipe makes for a great snack at any time of day. Eat it on its own or toasted and lightly buttered, or try it my favourite way: warm with a few dollops of organic natural yoghurt, fresh berries, a few sprigs of mint and a cup of French earl grey on the side.

A note for the low FODMAP-ers:
Dried coconut is moderately high in polyols. Due to the large amount of dried coconut in this recipe, it might not be suitable for those with fructose malabsorption/IBS. If you’re unsure, try a very thin slice of this loaf in one sitting, making sure you limit your FODMAP load before and after and monitor how you feel over the next 24 hours. If you don’t notice any undesirable symptoms, try a thicker slice the next day, ensuring that you’re mindful of what else you’re eating around that time. 

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Coconut, Banana & Raspberry Loaf

Ingredients

  • 200g dried coconut (desiccated, flaked or chips – NOT flour)
  • 6 large (60g) free range eggs, or 5 extra large (70g)
  • 1 large overripe banana, mashed
  • 1 tsp gluten and aluminium free baking powder
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tbs pure maple syrup
  • 1 heaped tsp pure vanilla extract or paste
  • 1 1/4 cup frozen raspberries

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180*C and line a 26cm loaf/bread tin with baking paper.
  2. In a high-speed food processor, process the dried coconut until it forms a crumbly flour-like consistency. Do not over-process it, as it will turn into butter. Add the baking powder and mix on low speed for a few seconds to combine.
  3. In an electric mixer, beat the eggs, maple syrup and vanilla on medium speed for a few minutes. Add the mashed banana and stir to combine.
  4. Fold the coconut flour mixture into the wet mixture, then gently fold through the frozen raspberries.
  5. Pour the batter into the lined loaf tin. Top the batter with extra raspberries and coconut chips. If I have some on hand, I also like to top the loaf with a few heaped teaspoons of good-quality natural raspberry jam, and swirl it through the top of the batter ever so slightly with the edge of the spoon. It adds an extra touch of tart deliciousness, while only adding a tiny amount of extra sugar.
  6. Bake at 180*C for 30 mins – at this point it should have risen significantly and started to deepen in colour. Turn the temperature down to 150*C and bake for a further 20-25 mins or until a skewer comes out clean. Mine took 55 mins in total. Remove from the oven and allow to stand in tin for 10 mins before removing from tin and placing on a wire rack to cool completely. You can eat it immediately (it will be difficult to cut until it’s cooled) or serve at a later date, warm or at room temperature. Store in an air-tight container away from direct sunlight for up to 3 days.

Happy Nourishing,
Ax

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